5 Ways to Support Your Gifted Child

Dear bloggers & Face Book users: please help us grow our little music school by sharing and reblogging this post – thank you – S

very_happy_child

You are now sure of it. Your child is gifted, and you want to do your best to support her. As the parent of a gifted child, it is important that you understand the challenges and opportunities this presents to your child. It is a joy to parent gifted children and to see them achieve extraordinary things. With Intelligence Quotients above 145, gifted children stand out from the ordinary. This is never easy to do,and the reaction of others is sometimes unkind. It is therefore important that, as a parent, you understand how to support them. Failure to adequately support your gifted child could result in them failing to realize their full potential.

The most important factor in developing your child’s giftedness is appropriate education. If your child is not yet enrolled in a gifted child program, be sure to have them enrolled in one. Gifted children who are not intellectually challenged will suffer emotionally and intellectually. Even if they are unable to participate full-time in a gifted child program, make sure that they have some exposure to similarly gifted children and to a curriculum which challenges and stimulates them intellectually. It may be necessary for them to change schools so that they can be in a supportive environment.

Finding mentors for your gifted child is a good way to support her. These mentors are themselves likely to be gifted and can share more than information with your children. They can also share life experiences and encourage them over the hurdles that giftedness can present. Mentors can also open doors to opportunities for learning and vocation.

Seek scholarships for your child. It is highly likely that you will be able to select from a variety of scholarships given the high intelligence of your child. Be sure, however, to seek a scholarship from a school or college which will support their area of interest and propel them onto greatness.

Talk to your child. This will be very important to ensuring the emotional stability of your child. Remember, giftedness sets your child apart from others. They may find it difficult to fit in with others and may need a respite at the end of the school day. Therefore, prepare a haven for your child at home. Allow them to pursue their own interests in a safe environment. Listen to them as they unload after a day at school and take your cues from the discussion.

Cultivate your child’s interests. It is very likely that your child will have a particular area of giftedness. Encourage her in this area. Support her with the resources she needs to develop her skills and interests. You can demonstrate your support by active participation where possible or just by being there when they engage in these activities. You can also read to your child or provide books about their areas of interest.

As you seek to support your gifted child, remember that though they are exceptional, they are still children. Allow them to be children even as they astound the world with their giftedness.

 

For 50+ Parenting Tips visit http://www.awesomeparents.com for more resources and information

Nigel is an experienced youthworker [full time since 1991] as well as having grown 3 children of his own [ably assisted by Jan his wife of over 30 years]. He can also be found at http://www.nigellane.net

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Nigel_Lane

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4427907

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3 thoughts on “5 Ways to Support Your Gifted Child

  1. Pingback: Homeschooling Gifted Children | Child Central

  2. Pingback: The Gifted Ex-Child | TalentDevelop

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