Digging For Laughs: Sources Of Humor For Public Speakers

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How was your last speech received by your audience? If you talked with them an hour, a day, or even a week after you gave the speech no matter how good their listening skills were, do you think that they … Continue reading

How To Win A Songwriting Contest

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You’re reading this because you want to know how to win a songwriting contest. Having produced music that has won first place in songwriting contests, sometimes for many thousands of dollars and having also been a songwriting contest judge I … Continue reading

Public Speaking – Professional Tips to Improve Your Speaking

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Today, to be successful, a person must have a good command of language. They must be able to express themselves clearly and fluently in ordinary business conversation, across the meeting room table or from the speaker’s platform. The rules that apply to success in public speaking also apply to the person who wants to move up the organisation.

In most situations, public speaking is private conversation raised to a larger audience. Effective communication in ordinary business conversation or public speaking is mostly about the effective transmission of ideas rather than the art of performance.

By applying the following tips you will become a more successful speaker who effectively conveys ideas either in public speaking or in private conversation.

Observe other Successful Speakers

Study what they do and how they do it. Also observe how the audience reacts to them. Emulate the speaker’s good points in your next speech but do not imitate the speaker.

Analyze Your Own Delivery

After you have spoken ask yourself – What went well? And, what will you do better next time? If possible record yourself for later review. When analyzing your performance you are looking for ways to improve. The objective is to find ways to enhance your delivery not to condemn it.

Seek Feedback

Ask other successful speakers and friends to comment on your speech. But be careful. You are looking for people who will want to help you succeed not to tear you down.

Keep the Audience in Mind

Ask yourself the following questions when preparing your speech – Why have I been asked to speak? What is their viewpoint? What type of organisation do they belong to? Is it a professional organisation etc? What age group?

Keep It Simple

Unless you are explaining a technical subject to other technical people, use plain everyday language. If the listener does not understand what you are saying they can become listless and bored. If you have chosen to read your speech or are delivering a memorised speech ensure that you are using spoken language rather than written language. Just because it reads well does not mean it sounds great when spoken.

Be Sincere

A part time speaker with something worthwhile to share, believes in what they are saying and enthusiastically delivers can outperform the professional speaker in the audience’s viewpoint.

Be Brief

Your talk should be long enough to cover the essentials fully but like good literature it should leave the listener wanting a little more.

Thorough Preparation

Preparation is of key importance to effective speaking. Being thoroughly prepared is key to building your self confidence.

Identify the principle reason for your speech. Research your idea fully so that you have mastered your subject. Logically set out your ideas so that your speech will convey your ideas effectively. And finally practice, practice, practice.

Success in business today is about effectively communicating ideas. By applying the above basic techniques you can quickly become adept at conveying your ideas. Being fully prepared, sincere in your delivery, to the point in your speech and considering the listener’s viewpoint you will soon improve your effectiveness.

 

Edward Hope is the editor and publisher of the recently published e-book “The Art of Great Conversation“. To claim your free preview at http://www.SelfConfidentSpeaking.com

 

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Conquering Performance Fears and Anxiety

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Dear bloggers & Face Book users: please help us grow our little music school by sharing and reblogging this post – thank you – S

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Performance fear or performance anxiety takes on several different forms. However, it is associated with the growing awareness and the need to perform according to the standard of your own field of activity, whether it’s your workplace, or an upcoming presentation or speech you must give, or for a specific sports activity. With the pressure to perform ones best, there is always a preconditioned mindset for the person suffering from performance fear that if anything should go wrong, that will eventually impact their performance and reduce it to failure.

Studies are still ongoing to determine exactly the cause of this fear but it is closely coupled to a persons desire to do better at something. As humans, we are not perfect so you need to recognize that experiencing performance fear is considered, completely normal. But some may often have an unrealistic level of fear or misconception about a given situation that impair their logical decision making capacities and can lead to substandard performance.

There are various types of performance fears or anxieties, whether it’s work related, public speaking, or sports event. Therefore, the ways, although similar, in which you deal with a particular fear, will differ as well. Following are some basic methods suggested in order to minimize the level of fear and associated level of anxiety with performing these different tasks.

In sports, the best way to get rid of any performance fears associated when competing at a sports event is to take it easy on yourself. Even the worlds best athletes have their days off, where they may not perform at their maximum potential. When engaged in sports, you cannot expect to win all the time and you must realize your team may lose on occasion. Whatever your sport or related activity, setting realistic goals is the first step that will help you deal with sports performance fears and anxiety. However, you can turn the adrenaline produced by your anxious feelings into energy that you can harness to perform better at your sport. And when you are performing the actual feat, try to enjoy the experience and you will find the process of competition more rewarding.

When Delivering a speech, many people have this fear of speaking in public. Most of that fear is produced by the pressure of having to deliver a flawless speech that is able to communicate the message to the audience effectively. Instead of letting that fear overtake you, harness it into a systematic plan that will ensure you have control over the situation.

Here are a few tips you can apply when preparing to deliver a speech. Be sure you plan ahead and allow time for research for your speech, even if you are an expert in your field. Doing some research can help to confirm your facts and reduce some of your anxiety. Plan ahead the schedule and location where the speech is going to be held. And I’m sure you heard this before, Practice. Practice. Practice.

As for the workplace, there are a few inherently stressful jobs that require a high level of standards for their employees to meet. To stay on top of job related performance anxiety, it is always a good idea to stop and talk about it, with either your boss, co-workers, or family members. Existing in isolation and trying to confront your fears alone could increase your fear thereby increasing your level of anxiety and make the situation worse. It is important to have the support of other people around you. Also, try to change your perspective. There are times where you may experience job inadequacies but view it as a learning curve or just an off day. Aiming for perfection is good but you need to realize that it is unachievable. You should focus on what you can contribute to the company instead of what you are failing to deliver. Is the glass half empty, or half full.

When managing and conquering fear, you need to understand that only you have power over your fear, especially when it determines how well you perform at something. Following are some tips that can be taken in order for you to overcome these fears; Try to identify the source of your problematic perception or anything that could trigger such fears. Once you have identified the external source of your anxiety, look within yourself. Determine how you react to it and why you react in that way. Desist from criticizing yourself or questioning your ability to perform. Instead of letting fear consume you, take the necessary steps and preparations needed for your optimum performance. After completing the performance of your speech, athletic event or job task, do not focus too much on areas of mistakes or failures in a way that it impairs your self-confidence. Instead, look at them as conditions that need improvement in order for you to do better in your next performance.

One final note in dealing with conquering your fears is to seek out some self help information such as articles, audio tapes or videos dealing with this subject. Realize you are not alone in these feelings and many people have contributed some very helpful tactics that will help you to conquer your fear.

 

The author has been studying the reasons for and remedies of our fears to better his own. He believes that all fears can be conquered, which if not dealt with, can hamper a persons ability to achieve all they want from their lives. A video tutorial is available at [http://www.conqure-your-fears.com]

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Andre_Beauchamp

Overcome Performance Anxiety Class ! for Actors & Musicians

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PantherMedia 1264955Let’s face it.. there are a bunch of us who get the butterflies before we step on stage, hit record in the studio, or read for a part at an audition. For some people this can make or break their performance before they even begin. But it’s not just about stepping in front of an audience. Some just have difficulty getting the best out of their performance in certain settings, like the studio or reading for a certain director. We understand.. & we’d like to help.

Join Master Hypnotist & Fellow Musician Collin Sonny Rosati for an afternoon of.. you guess it !

Hypnosis for Overcoming Performance Anxiety

Have you tried all of the tricks and you still can’t get the words out right? Try coming out to our Performance Anxiety class where we combine common sense and experience with Hypnosis Meditation. It might sound a little strange at first.. But Hypnosis Meditations are great for quieting the nerves – & when you quiet your nerves – your real performance can begin.

Did you know.. ?

Sonny has been a practicing Hypnotist for a long time.. It’s been almost 14 years since he left Hypnosis School and began helping with hypnosis…

Here’s a link to some of the old TV clips – http://thesunnyside.net/about/

Sonny has been bouncing around a bit this summer but he’s back home in Vancouver, and helping Actors, Musicians, Speakers, Comedians, Sales People, Teachers etc.. with Performance Anxiety.

Did you know pt2… ?

Sonny designs and writes the Hypnosis Meditations for his classes. As a Master Hypnotist, Sonny wrote a “Script Book” for practicing hypnotists and he still writes and records Hypnosis Meditations for his FaceBook page – I Love You Because..https://www.facebook.com/pages/I-love-you-because/121132551291069

Next month’s class will be.. Hypnosis to Overcome Approach Anxiety – This is based on the best of both the Inner Game Guy classes for confidence and the Romantic Magic Workshop to find true love.

Keep your eyes open for discounts through Groupon!

Want to try before you buy..? & the youtube sessions aren’t enough – check out Sonny’s Real World Vancouver Hypnosis Meetup Group that meets every Wednesday evening in Kitsilano – it’s free ! just remember to RSVP
http://www.meetup.com/internationalhypnosis/

Please register early using the form below

Cost $45 but there’s a Groupon deal available on the web!

Next Class – Sunday November 1, 2013

http://www.thesunnysidemusic.com

http://www.hypnosisvancouver.com

http://www.thesunnyside.net

Tips for Dealing With Music Performance Nerves Part 1

Dear bloggers & Face Book users: please help us grow our little music school by sharing and reblogging this post – thank you – S

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It is important for performers to seek methods to deal with the feelings accompanying fear and nerves. The following are several simple methods to alleviate mild nervousness.

1. Before performing, you must first remember that you have practiced to the best of your ability and remind yourself of this. You have used your practicing skills in the most effective way you know. Of course, there will always be things you look to improve in your playing, but given all the circumstances that have led to this moment, you have worked hard as you can. Now the practicing is over. What you will do now, is to use your “hook point”, (what?) something you would have encountered during practice sessions. The hook point (hp) is at work, for example, when you learn the fingering for a piece. When you repeat and reinforce the new patterns, the hp is the moment where your brain starts to recognise the pattern and become familiar with what your fingers are doing, usually after many repetitions. The information from this process is retained, so that when you go on to practice other areas like articulation/dynamics, you don’t have to think too hard about the fingering. The most comforting aspect of the hp is that when it is time for you to perform, what you do is recall what/where was the hp, or areas you played easily during practice. Usually, once your ear recognises a passage you’ve practiced many times over, your brain will trigger the familiarity that the fingers developed in practice.

2. Do not draw conclusions about what just happened or what might/might not happen. Self-criticism while performing is pointless because it takes you out of the here and now and destroys your focus and physical actions.

Whatever the criticism, it introduces a verbal aspect into an activity that is most successful when it is non-verbal. Reserve judgment for after the performance, preferably after you have listened to other people’s reactions. Rather than judge your playing, simply observe it without saying anything, and play from the heart. For example, when you are about to make a crescendo, go for it and then feel it as you are doing it. There is nothing verbal about this process. You are, rather, putting intention into action – that is, motivating.

3. Do not second-guess the audiences reaction to your playing. When performing we become mind readers and believe we know exactly what the responses to our playing are. More often than not, these thoughts prove to be completely, wildly inaccurate and only serve to further distract us from our aim. An example: I was once playing a recital, with only twenty people in the audience. As soon as I came out to perform, I noticed a guy who looked familiar, but whom I could not quite place where I had seen him before. For most of the first piece, I was only partially thinking about the music, the other part, wondering who he was and (even worse) what he thought about the playing (crazy I know).

Finally I remembered that he was a respected piano teacher and accompanist I once met at a music shop near where I live. He was undoubtedly going to listen to the music on the program with a keen attention to detail and pick holes at the whole performance. Throughout the entire time, I was preoccupied with these thoughts and not surprisingly, the whole experience became gradually uncomfortable for me. Afterward, when he came to speak to me, I discovered that this piano teacher was, in fact, a jazz and pop specialist rather than a connoisseur of classical music and was very complimentary of my performance. Later I thought, “what an incredible waste of mental energy!” How remarkable it is that the vast resources of ones imagination can be used for such futile, self-destructive mind-games! You probably have had similar experiences.

Trying to imagine what the audience thinks of your playing is useless and distracting. You must please yourself first.

 

Ugo Onwutalu is a musician and piano teacher, also playing the guitar and organ. He is the founder of Grade Music Tutors, a UK music tuition production and entertainment organisation based in London. Visit http://www.grademusicworld.com for information on everything music-related, from learning an instrument and preparing for your exams, to getting a job in the music industry.

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ugo_Onwutalu

Tips You Can Use To Overcome Stage Fright

Dear bloggers & Face Book users: please help us grow our little music school by sharing and reblogging this post – thank you – S

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As one of the most common phobias, stage fright afflicts many people. It is estimated that every 3 out of 4 people suffer from it. It is easier to overcome stage fright when you keep that fact in mind. Also keep in mind that a little bit of nervousness and anticipation is normal before taking the spotlight.

A well used method to overcome stage fright would be to imagine the audience naked. This visualization permits a couple of things to happen: First, the novelty of picturing a roomful of nude people distracts you from being afraid, and second, thinking of the audience as naked puts them in a lower social station. Furthermore if they disapproved of your performance, their opinions would not matter. They are not with it enough to wear clothing.

The next tip to overcome stage fright would be to become at ease in the location that you will be making the presentation at. Get there ahead of time. Move around the room and stand in the spot where you will be situated. Look around; find a comfort spot to take a look at in case you will need to regain your composure for several seconds throughout the presentation.

And finally, one of the best ideas to overcome stage fright is to concentrate on your expertise. Once you recognize that you might be talking on a subject that you’re most comfortable with, the feeling of anxiety will soon dissipate.

Try not be distracted or rushed on the day of your performance. As much as you can, you ought to be relaxed and calm. This may be completed by picturing what the whole performance would be like all the way through, from beginning to end.

Should you need to face an audience of any size, familiarization is the key to calming those frayed nerves. It begins with the topic that you’re going to be talking on. Regardless of whether or not you’re making an official presentation or giving the toast at your sister’s wedding, you’ve been asked to do so simply because you’re considered capable of it.

In numerous cases the two factors of performance outcome and possible consequences may be evaluated realistically and minimized in a way that the performer has the capacity to overcome stage fright, and go on stage. In other instances one or more cognitive distortions may possibly amplify the performer’s perceptions, and not enable the performer to have a realistic assessment of the risks and rewards of obtaining in front of the audience. These cognitive distortions can effectively paralyze the individual from sharing her or his skills with other people.

I don’t like being afraid of doing things, especially when that fear is hindering my dreams and ideas. I’m sure I’m not alone on this, so it is my goal to help others overcome their fears. Getting in front of an audience doesn’t have to be scary. To read more about how to overcome stage fright, go to http://www.squidoo.com/you-can-overcome-stage-fright. If you want to overcome stage fright permanently, increase confidence, and renew your self-esteem, then please go to http://www.overcomestagefright.info.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Tracy_D._Ryback