Performance Anxiety Children – 7 Ways You Can Identify This Anxiety Disorder in Your Child!

Dear bloggers & Face Book users: please help us grow our little music school by sharing and reblogging this post – thank you – S

5-Ways-to-Overcome-Stage-Fright

Presenting itself through a number of signs and symptoms, performance anxiety is a social anxiety disorder that affects people who perform in public for example; singers, actors, musicians, and public speakers or master of ceremonies. Your child may also experience this condition if s/he is made a part of the debate team or a part of the school play or such similar part. The most common root cause of this ailment is feelings of inadequacy on the part of your child. This article will reveal 7 of the most common triggers that you can learn to recognize and know if your child is suffering from performance anxiety (PA)…

1. Stage Fright…
This is one of the most common indicators of this performance anxiety according to author Martin Richfield. It mostly occurs in the form of a paralyzing fear and immobility. Your child becomes unable to move or speak; this scenario is mostly brought on due to your child’s irrational fear of humiliation or rejection by his or her classmates or playmates.

2. Lack Of Concentration…
Another common sign of PA in your child is his or her inability of to concentrate. Becoming confused of losing focus are results that can be directly traced back to feelings of fear or apprehensive thoughts which may have overtaking your child’s mind and affected his or her ability to complete the present task at hand.

3. Perspiration…
Excessive swearing from various orifices in your child’s body, particularly your hands, feet and face, is another sign that s/he might be experiencing a bout of performance anxiety. What occurs is that the brain sends signals to the body which causes “hot flashes” and results in a large volume of perspiration due to emotional stress. When this occurs, your child begins to feel uncomfortable and self-conscious.

4. Quivering…
Shaking or quaking uncontrollable is a common occurrence while experiencing PA. This shacking generally occurs around your child’s hands and knees. Adrenaline is sent through your child’s body as a defense mechanism which results in uncontrollable quivering. This is also referred to as “fight or flight” mode.

5. Dyspnea…
More commonly referred to as shortness of breath, is a very common occurrence while experiencing a bout of PA. Hyperventilation, gasping for air, an increased heart rate etc are all linked to dyspnea and occurs when your child is afraid of performing.

6. Lightheadedness…
While performing your child may become woozy or faint headed, this dizziness is a typical sign of performance anxiety and can cause your child to lose his or her balance. This is due to the brain not getting the required amount of oxygen and blood needed to function properly. Your child may begin to see a spinning hall or room and can potentially faint if the anxiety is intense.

7. Adrenaline Rush…
You will know this through your child’s increased heart rate. While experiencing PA, adrenaline will be released into your child’s body as a survival response, which is what causes the increased heart rate; in fact, the more afraid your child becomes, the faster his or her heart will beat.

 

Ty Lamai is an avid researcher and writer with in-depth knowledge spanning a wide variety of topics. He has hundreds of articles published online and has a blog dedicated to info about performance anxiety in children [http://analyze-more.com/anxietyblog/how-to-treat-performance-anxiety-do-this-and-your-next-performance-will-be-a-hit%e2%80%a6guaranteed] which you should visit today.

 

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Ty_Lamai

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s